Member Spotlight: Beth Drake

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Where do you live?
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin

What event are you running with Team for Kids?
The TCS New York City Marathon!

What excites you most about running your event with Team for Kids?
Being able to support kids and give them the opportunities to reach their full potential.

What is your favorite place to run and why?
My favorite place to run is around my parent’s lake at their cabin. It is beautiful and calming.

If you run with music, what are your favorite artists or songs to listen to?
I listen to an array of songs from old to new, just no metal!

What is your favorite post-run meal?
Burger!

When did your relationship with running begin and why?
About 2-3 years ago. I joined Moms On The Run in Eau Claire and they sparked something in me that I will forever be grateful. The support and friendships are amazing!

Do you have any pre-race rituals or superstitions, if so, please explain?
Laying out my outfit the night before and having my breakfast ready (PB&J and a banana) and everything else I need. Spaghetti the night before!

Why did you choose to run this event?
I am a teacher, so I believe in and love children. They learn healthy habits early in life and the more we can guide them and help them make good choices the better for them in the long run.

Tell us a little more about yourself:
I am a 2 year old teacher and have been teaching for almost 10 years now. I am married to my husband Jeremy and we have a son named Theo. He is the light of our lives! We will be adopting our second child in the near future!

Connect with Beth via the link below:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Beth.drake 

Tip of the Week: What’s Your Pace?

When it comes to endurance training, pacing is one of the most important concepts that we need to learn as long distance runners. Most runners underestimate the importance of easy runs and complete their easy and long runs at a pace that is TOO fast. Many runners, specifically “new” runners, either make the assumption that every long run has to be completed at their goal marathon pace or don’t have the experience to know what their goals are or what their pace should be for a given workout, be it easy, marathon pace, tempo, long run, etc.

Last week, we asked everyone at practice, or on your own, to complete a 5K race at a 5K effort (HARD effort at 2:2 to 1:1 breathing pattern). We completed this 5K to create a baseline of every runner’s current fitness level, regardless of experience. Now that you have a recent “race” under your belt you can utilize the following “pace calculator” to determine your current training paces and learn a little more about your individual pacing. We can even utilize the calculator to determine equivalent race performances for the time you entered. This information is great for measuring your fitness and setting goals in upcoming races based on previous performances.

Here’s how to use the Run Smart Calculator:

1- Go to: www.runsmartproject.com/calculator/
2- Enter distance- 5K
3- Enter your 5K finish time- click “Calculate”
4- Record the following times:

* Race Pace Tab: 5K Pace/mile
* Training Tab: Pace/mile
* Easy Pace
* Marathon Pace
* Threshold (Tempo)
* Equivalent” Tab… Note the following:
* Estimated Half Marathon
* Estimated Marathon

**NOTE: Most running experts agree that your EASY pace is approximately 60-90 seconds slower/mile than your estimated marathon pace (this can vary based on the duration of your workout). It is recommended that you add 60-90 seconds to your estimated marathon pace to determine your easy (long run) pace.

NYRR Youth Programs 2015-2016 Highlights

We’re excited to announce a record-breaking school year for youth runners in New York City and across the nation! New York Road Runners Team for Kids runners we are incredibly grateful for all your fundraising efforts in support of NYRR youth programs. Thank you for the endless inspiration and for raising critical funds to serve our youth! Read the full Press Release here: http://bit.ly/2913goq

Team for Kids runners fundraise to provide free NYRR youth running programs, events and resources to over 215,000 youth across the nation. NYRR youth programs empower youth of all athletic abilities to get moving in addition to teaching teamwork, perseverance, and more! The NYRR breadth of services includes school and team-based programs like Mighty Milers and Young Runners, widely-attended NYRR road races and Youth Jamborees, and educational resources like Running Start, NYRR’s award-winning video series for coaching young runners. See below for highlights from the 2015-2016 school year made possible thanks to our Team for Kids runners!

Disparities in Physical Education in NYC

In May 2015, New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer released Dropping the Ball: Disparities in Physical Education in New York City School that reported:

  • 26% percent of children in grades K-8 are obese or severely obese
  • 32% of NYC’s schools do not have full-time certified PE teachers
  • 28% of NYC’s schools do not have dedicated space for PE

NYRR is addressing these disparities and providing free running programming to 37% of New York City schools.

NYRR Youth Program Impact 2015-2016 Highlights

  • Served more than 215,000 students locally and nationally through free NYRR youth running programs, events, and resources, including more than 120,000 in New York City’s five boroughs.
  • Established running programs in 1000+ schools and community centers nationwide.
  • Mighty Milers in the U.S.A. ran over 5.8 million miles.
  • Mighty Milers in the U.S.A. earned 121,292 “marathon of miles” medals.
  • More than 7,400 public school students participated in NYRR’s Developmental Track & Field Series, a partnership with the New York City Department of Education.
  • 165 sites and more than 7,400 kids participated in the NYRR Developmental Track & Field Series presented by Tata Consultancy Services, a partnership with the New York City Department of Education.
  • At 2 NYRR Youth Jamborees presented by Tata Consultancy Services, more than 2,400 runners in pre-K through high school participated in a variety of track and field events.
  • Nearly 6,500 runners participated in the 9 events comprising the NYRR Youth Running Series.
  • More than 3,000 kids participated in 3 Mighty Milers Fun Runs, including more than 650 kids from 27 sites who were a part of the Million Kid Run on Global Running Day at Icahn Stadium on Randall’s Island.
  • NYRR Mighty Milers and Young Runners received more than 3,800 free pairs of running shoes as part of The NYRR Sneaker Closet
  • NYRR awarded $44,225 worth of books to 378 Mighty Milers sites who ran more than 789,000  miles towards new books as part of NYRR’s Miles for Books initiative.

For current Team for Kids runners, when asking for support, quantify the impact of Team for Kids with the 2015-2016 Youth Program Infographics linked here!

To view additional highlights, social media impact images, and site stories and photos, visit the “Youth Program” category on our blog and visit our Facebook Albums for Global Running Day, Mighty Milers Fun Run,  and Young Runners Championships!

Member Spotlight: Andrew Zahler

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Where do you live?
Jersey City, NJ

What event are you running with Team for Kids?
The 2016 TCS New York City Marathon!

What excites you most about running your event with Team for Kids?
I’m most excited about the camaraderie and sense of shared purpose that go with training for a long-distance event and fundraising for a worthy cause. I look forward to meeting fellow TFK runners at group training runs this summer and fall.

What is your favorite place to run and why?
I love running on the Hudson River waterfront in Jersey City and Hoboken for the air, ample sunlight on sunny days, views of Manhattan and presence of lots of other runners.

If you run with music, what are your favorite artists or songs to listen to?
LCD Soundsystem’s “45:33” is a driving, evolving track that lasts 45 minutes, 33 seconds — a great length for a regular run. I also enjoy listening to podcasts like This American Life, Radiolab and Serial.

What is your favorite post-run meal?
PB&J with a banana and plenty of water.

When did your relationship with running begin and why?
I’ve been running off and on since I was a kid, but I’d say I got really serious about it when I moved to New York in 2011. That’s when I discovered Prospect Park, bought my first pair of real running shoes and signed up for my first race with NYRR, the Jingle Bell Jog. I got serious because I wanted to improve my health, in all senses of the word, and let off steam from my stressful job.

Do you have any pre-race rituals or superstitions, if so, please explain?
The night before, I lay out my race gear and map my transit to the race down to the minute. In the morning, I get up nice and early to fully wake up and have a proper breakfast. I realize these things are not that extraordinary, but they all contribute to me arriving at the corrals relaxed and ready to run.

Why did you choose to run this event?
I first signed up with Team for Kids in 2014 to get guaranteed entry to the 2015 NYC Half, and I had such a great experience that I wanted to do it again for the marathon — even though I already had entry.

I feel connected to TFK’s mission because growing up I was fortunate to have organized sports and parents who encouraged me to be active, and it established healthy habits that I have maintained. Doing so helps me stay grounded and happy, and of course physically healthy. I realize that a lot of kids don’t have the opportunities I did but could benefit just as much if not more from being active. Raising funds for youth running programs is something I can do to help solve that problem.

Tell us a little more about yourself
I’m an editor. I’m getting married in August. I brew beer. I cheer for any sports team from Seattle, where I grew up. I have lived in Portland, Ore.; Columbia, Mo., Washington, D.C.; and Prague, Czech Republic. I used to play a lot of bass guitar and will again someday. I’m a grownup who still enjoys playing video games.

Connect with Andrew via the sites below:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/azahler/
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/andrewzahler
Website: http://www.andrewzahler.com

The Team for Kids Impact!

We’re excited to announce a record-breaking school year for youth runners in New York City and across the nation! New York Road Runners Team for Kids runners we are incredibly grateful for all your fundraising efforts in support of NYRR youth programs. Thank you for the endless inspiration and for raising critical funds to serve our youth!

Read the full Press Release here: http://bit.ly/2913goq

Tip of the Week: Injury vs. Soreness?

Am I just sore? Or is it an actual injury? This is a common question that endurance athletes often face, and it can be a fine line distinguishing symptoms between the two.

We all come from different athletic backgrounds, and understanding your body from the perspective of fitness, exertion thresholds, acclimation and recovery is very important in mitigating your chance of injury and reducing muscle soreness.

Muscle Soreness is often felt after a long workout, a hard workout, and especially in the beginning of training as different muscles are engaged in your training routine. The soreness felt after a workout is called DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness) and can begin anywhere between hours after a workout and up to 2 days. Many marathon runners have gone to the gym before and felt the sorest 2 days after the workout. This is an example of DOMS. The discomfort here felt by athletes is often confused as an injury when in fact, its muscle soreness and completely normal. Muscle soreness, generally speaking, can often be pinpointed as discomfort felt in general areas of the body (i.e. front of legs) whereas an injury tends to be more centralized to a specific location (i.e. IT band, kneecap, etc.). Soreness can be tender to the touch, whereas an injury tends to be more of a sharp, acute pain.

One of the other methods of distinguishing between soreness and injury is to determine whether the discomfort is symmetrical. For example, if the discomfort exists on both sides (i.e. both quads, both hips, both hamstrings), it can likely be determined as soreness versus an injury. While this is not a perfect science, it can give you, the athlete, a starting point for the initial step of self-evaluation.

A few helpful tips to alleviate the soreness and decrease your chance of injury.

1) Most important: listen to your body! Don’t try to be a hero and keep fighting what your body is trying to tell you. If your muscles are needing a bit more rest, scale back the miles or back off the intensity. Let the body get the recovery it needs. Doing some light non-impact exercise (bike, swim, etc.) is one of the best ways to expedite the recovery process and help your body “loosen” up.

2) Active 3D stretching before and after exercise is a great way to eliminate the “fuzz” (fascial restrictions) that we experience after exercise or even after a night of sleep. Movement (functional stretching) increases the circulation in our body (warms it up) so we don’t feel as stiff the days following a workout.

3) Hydration is key. Over 70% of our bodies is made of water so we must replace the fluids and electrolytes that we lose with exercise. The rule of thumb for proper hydration is to consume .6 times your body weight in ounces of “pure” water per day.

4) Eating after your workout: eating within 30 minutes of your workouts is optimal to alleviate soreness as this is the most critical period for your body to restore the glycogen (fuel) that has been lost during workouts. A combination of carbohydrates and protein is recommended.

5) When all is fails, revert back to tip #1 and listen to your body.

In summary, muscle soreness is completely normal as your body adapts to the strenuous demands of endurance training. If discomfort in a particular area is persistent, seeing a doctor or physical therapist as soon as possible is the best course of action. If unsure, speak to your coaches ASAP.

Boot Camp Fitness Class

Join us on Sunday, July 10th for a special one-hour Boot Camp Fitness Class to support New York Road Runners’ (NYRR) Youth Programs, which serve over 200,000 students annually with free running and fitness experiences. A minimum donation of $25 per person is required.

During this special Boot Camp Fitness Class hosted by Michelle Stiglitz, you will sweat your way through a series of various exercises, all to support a good cause.

All fitness levels are welcome to participate! 100% of the proceeds will go toward supporting NYRR’s Youth Programs.

Facebook Event: http://bit.ly/NYRRBootCampFB
Donate: http://bit.ly/NYRRBootCampDonate